American Academy of Ophthalmology

View all recommendations from this society

Released February 21, 2013

Don’t routinely order imaging tests for patients without symptoms or signs of significant eye disease.

If patients do not have symptoms or signs of significant disease pathology, then clinical imaging tests are not generally needed because a comprehensive history and physical examination will usually reveal if eye disease is present or is getting worse. Examples of routine imaging include: visual-field testing; optical coherence tomography (OCT) testing; retinal imaging of patients with diabetes; and neuroimaging or fundus photography. If symptoms or signs of disease are present, then imaging tests may be needed to evaluate further and to help in treatment planning.


These items are provided solely for informational purposes and are not intended as a substitute for consultation with a medical professional. Patients with any specific questions about items on this list or their individual situation should consult their ophthalmologist.

How The List Was Created

The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s Medical Director of Health Policy and Health Policy Committee led the Academy’s list development process. Members of the Health Policy Committee initially identified potential recommendations based on relevance, appropriateness and potential for improvement and efficiency. Through society notifications and newsletter notices, other ophthalmic organizations and subspecialty societies and members were invited to offer feedback and recommend ideas to be included in the final recommendations. Health Policy Committee members and the Medical Director of Health Policy reviewed the ideas and supporting evidence, and ranked them in order of potential impact. The top five recommendations were presented to the Academy’s Board of Trustees for approval.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology’s disclosure and conflict of interest policy can be found at www.aao.org

Sources

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American Academy of Ophthalmology Retina Panel. Preferred Practice Pattern® Guidelines. Idiopathic Macular Hole [Internet]. San Francisco, CA: American Academy of Ophthalmology; 2008 [cited 2012 28 Sep]. Available from: one.aao.org/CE/PracticeGuidelines/PPP_Content.aspx?cid=6f2be59d-6481-4c64-9a3e-8d1dabec9ffa.

American Academy of Ophthalmology Retina Panel. Preferred Practice Pattern® Guidelines. Age-Related Macular Degeneration [Internet]. San Francisco, CA: American Academy of Ophthalmology; 2008 [cited 2012 28 Sep]. Available from: one.aao.org/CE/PracticeGuidelines/PPP_Content.aspx?cid=f413917a-8623-4746-b441-f817265eafb4.

American Academy of Ophthalmology Retina Panel. Preferred Practice Pattern® Guidelines. Diabetic Retinopathy [Internet]. San Francisco, CA: American Academy of Ophthalmology; 2008 [cited 2012 28 Sep]. Available from: one.aao.org/CE/PracticeGuidelines/PPP_Content.aspx?cid=d0c853d3-219f-487b-a524-326ab3cecd9a.

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